Après avoir été laissé à l'air libre pendant 24 heures, un test de détection du radon indique la concentration de ce gaz dans une maison.
Après avoir été laissé à l'air libre pendant 24 heures, un test de détection du radon indique la concentration de ce gaz dans une maison.

Clarence-Rockland warns against radon gas

Christopher Smith
Christopher Smith
EAP
Radon gas is mostly unknown, which makes it all the more dangerous.

The City of Clarence-Rockland, in partnership with the Take Action on Radon coalition (TAR), has released a public notice to raise awareness of the dangers of radon gas. It is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers and can be found in homes across the country. Although Canada has a National Radon Plan, many Canadians remain unaware of the danger. 

“On average 58 Canadians will die from lung cancer every day, making it the leading cause of cancer death in Canada,” said Lynn Murad, a cancer prevention specialist at the Canadian Cancer Society. “It’s important that Canadians know they can control their risk from radon by testing their homes and reducing their exposure.” 

Clarence-Rockland invites residents to attend a free Radon Information Session on October 25 to learn more about the effects of the gas and where they can pick up a radon detector. The municipality is also participating in the 100 Radon Test Kit Challenge, an initiative by TAR that provides 100 free radon test kits to communities where testing doesn’t happen as frequently. 

“Testing for radon is simple to do, and there are effective solutions available to reduce radon levels in homes where radon levels are elevated,” said TAR project manager Pam Warkentin. “The first step is to know your radon level. Every home needs to test for radon – it’s that simple.” 

Citizens can sign up for the October 25 information session and the 100 Test Kit Challenge at https://takeactiononradon.ca/100-radon-test-kit-challenge/