Alicia Heinzle, garde forestière de la bibliothèque Champlain, a recruté des bénévoles pour le projet Butterflyway, une initiative visant à favoriser les fleurs sauvages et les plantes indigènes pour aider les pollinisateurs tels que les abeilles et les papillons dans la communauté.
Alicia Heinzle, garde forestière de la bibliothèque Champlain, a recruté des bénévoles pour le projet Butterflyway, une initiative visant à favoriser les fleurs sauvages et les plantes indigènes pour aider les pollinisateurs tels que les abeilles et les papillons dans la communauté.

Volunteers help bees, butterflies pollinate in Champlain

Stephen Jeffery
EAP
More than 30 volunteers are creating a better environment for pollinators in the Champlain and East Hawkesbury townships.  

Champlain Library was chosen to take part in the “Butterflyway Project”, a David Suzuki Foundation initiative to promote the propagation of native wildflowers and plants in local communities. The plants were intended to benefit pollinators, such as bees and butterflies, around the community. 

The Vankleek Hill and District Horticultural Society and Foodland Vankleek Hill donated seeds and bulbs for the project. Thirty-one residents from Champlain and East Hawkesbury volunteered to plant the native flowers and plants from pollinator “starter packs” in their communities. 

Ranger Alicia Heinzle said the response in the library’s first year of participating was fantastic. The starter packs were made available at the library last Thursday, and the project was expected to expand in the coming years.